February 26, 2024

Income statement and projected income statement – profit and loss (P&L) statement

Income statement profit and loss (P&L) statement

An income statement, also known as a profit and loss (P&L) statement, is a financial statement that provides a summary of a company’s revenues, expenses, and profits (or losses) over a specific period of time, usually a fiscal quarter or year. It is one of the key financial documents used by businesses to assess their financial performance and profitability. The income statement follows a basic formula:

Income Statement Formula:

Revenue (Sales) – Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) = Gross Profit

Gross Profit – Operating Expenses (e.g., salaries, rent, utilities)   = Operating Income (or Operating Profit)

Operating Income (or Operating Profit)+/- Other Income or Expenses (e.g., interest, taxes)  = Net Income (or Net Profit) ) – Cost

Here’s a brief explanation of each component:

  1. Revenue (Sales): This represents the total amount of money generated by the sale of goods or services.
  2. Cost of Goods Sold (COGS): This includes all the direct costs associated with producing or delivering the goods or services sold. It typically includes raw materials, labor, and manufacturing overhead.
  3. Gross Profit: Gross profit is the difference between revenue and COGS. It indicates the profitability of a company’s core operations.
  4. Operating Expenses: These are the costs incurred to run the day-to-day operations of the business, such as salaries, rent, utilities, marketing, and other overhead expenses.
  5. Operating Income (Operating Profit): This is the profit derived from a company’s normal operating activities. It’s calculated by subtracting operating expenses from gross profit.
  6. Other Income or Expenses: These are non-operating items like interest income, interest expenses, and taxes. They can either add to or subtract from operating income.
  7. Net Income (Net Profit): This is the final profit figure after accounting for all revenues, expenses, and other income or expenses. It represents the overall profitability of the business.

Projected income statement (a pro forma income statement)

A projected income statement, also known as a pro forma income statement, is a financial statement that provides an estimate of a company’s future financial performance. It’s typically prepared for a specific period, such as the next quarter or fiscal year, and is based on assumptions and forecasts. Projected income statements are valuable tools for businesses to plan, set financial goals, and make informed decisions about future operations and investments.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to prepare a projected income statement:

  1. Gather Historical Data: Start by collecting historical financial data, such as income statements, for the company. This data will serve as a foundation for your projections and help you identify trends.
  2. Set the Time Period: Determine the time period for which you want to create the projected income statement. Common periods include the next quarter, next fiscal year, or multiple years.
  3. Sales Revenue Forecast: Estimate the company’s future sales revenue. This is typically the most critical component of the income statement. Consider factors such as market trends, customer demand, sales pipelines, and historical sales data. Break down revenue by product lines or business segments if applicable.
  4. Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) Forecast: Calculate the projected cost of goods sold. This includes expenses directly associated with producing or delivering the goods or services sold. Consider factors like changes in raw material costs, labor expenses, and production efficiencies.
  5. Gross Profit Forecast: Subtract the projected COGS from the projected sales revenue to calculate the gross profit. This figure represents the profitability of the company’s core operations.
  6. Operating Expenses Forecast: Estimate all operating expenses for the projected period. This includes items like salaries, rent, utilities, marketing, and administrative costs. Be sure to consider any expected changes or growth in these expenses.
  7. Operating Income (Operating Profit) Forecast: Subtract the projected operating expenses from the gross profit to calculate the operating income (also known as operating profit). This reflects the profitability of the company’s core operations before accounting for non-operating items.
  8. Other Income and Expenses Forecast: Estimate any non-operating items such as interest income, interest expenses, and taxes. These items can either add to or subtract from the operating income.
  9. Net Income (Net Profit) Forecast: Subtract all non-operating expenses from the operating income to determine the projected net income. This is the final profit figure after accounting for all revenues, expenses, and other income or expenses.
  10. Review and Revise: Continuously review and revise your assumptions and forecasts as new information becomes available or as market conditions change. Be prepared to adjust your projections accordingly.
  11. Sensitivity Analysis: Consider conducting sensitivity analyses by varying key assumptions to understand how different scenarios may impact the projected income statement.
  12. Documentation: Document the assumptions, methodologies, and data sources used in your projections. This documentation is crucial for transparency and future reference.

Remember that projected income statements are forward-looking and inherently uncertain. They are based on assumptions, and actual results may differ from projections. Therefore, it’s essential to make realistic and well-informed estimates and regularly update your projections as circumstances change. Projected income statements are valuable tools for financial planning, but they should be used in conjunction with other financial analysis techniques for a comprehensive view of a company’s financial future.

Example of projected income statement

Creating an example of a projected income statement requires specific data and assumptions related to a company’s financials. Below is a simplified example of a projected income statement for a fictional small retail business for the fiscal year 2024:

Fictional Retail Company – Projected Income Statement for Fiscal Year 2024

|   Actual FY 2023   |   Projected FY 2024      | %Change

—————————————————————————————————————————————

Revenue                                       |    $500,000             |    $550,000                        |+10%

—  Cost of Goods Sold (COGS)  | $300,000                |    $330,000                        |+10%

—————————————————————————————————————————————–

== Gross Profit                                 |    $200,000             |    $220,000                         | +10%

— Operating Expenses:

– Salaries                   |    $80,000                        |    $85,000                    |      +6.25%

– Rent                         |    $20,000                         |    $21,000                          | +5%

– Utilities                  |    $10,000                         |    $11,000                          | +10%

– Marketing            |    $15,000                         |    $16,000                          | +6.67%

– Other                   |    $10,000                          |    $10,000                           |  0%

—————————————————————————————————————————————

== Operating Income

(Operating Profit)                   | $65,000                          |    $77,000              | +18.46%

—  Other Income and Expenses:

– Interest Income   |    $2,000                           |    $2,500                    | +25%

– Interest Expenses |    $4,000                            |    $4,500                      | +12.5%

– Taxes                       |    $12,000                           |    $14,000                     | +16.67%

————————————————————————————————————————————–

== Net Income (Net Profit)         |   $51,000                         |      $60,000                              | +17.65%

In this example:

  • The company is projecting a 10% increase in revenue for the fiscal year 2024 based on expected growth in sales.
  • The cost of goods sold (COGS) is also projected to increase by 10%, in line with the increase in revenue, maintaining a consistent gross profit margin.
  • Operating expenses are forecasted to rise to reflect anticipated increases in salaries, rent, utilities, and marketing costs.
  • Other income and expenses include interest income, interest expenses, and taxes, which are projected to change based on expected financial activities and tax rates.
  • The net income for the fiscal year 2024 is projected to be $60,000, representing a 17.65% increase over the previous fiscal year.

Please note that this is a simplified and hypothetical example. In reality, projected income statements would involve more detailed assumptions and a comprehensive analysis of various factors affecting the company’s financial performance. Additionally, actual results may vary from projections due to unforeseen events and market conditions.

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